Detroit police dumped the SUV after protesters hooded

 Mostly peaceful protests against systemic racism and police brutality in southwest Detroit Two late-night protesters jumped on a police SUV hood, and others crowded around it.    As the overhead lights were lit, the driver opened fire on the accelerator and sent both of them to the pavement while the vehicle was blowing. One of them grabbed her leg and limped as she got up. The other man appeared unconscious. The two went back to Patton Park.


Mostly peaceful protests against systemic racism and police brutality in southwest Detroit Two late-night protesters jumped on a police SUV hood, and others crowded around it.


As the overhead lights were lit, the driver opened fire on the accelerator and sent both of them to the pavement while the vehicle was blowing. One of them grabbed her leg and limped as she got up. The other man appeared unconscious. The two went back to Patton Park.

One of the protesters thrown from the hood of the vehicle was 24-year-old Jay Bass of Detroit. He said police tried to prevent the Marches from returning to Patton Park. They tried to drive the protesters through the roadblocks and some police vehicles started moving.

The boss said he tried to stand in front of a police SUV to stop the protesters before it could endanger them.

"In response, they float it," Bass said. "He went too fast. I and a few other managers fled. We were blown away. He ran over some hands and feet. He ran over his phone. I think I was the last one. I was in the car." I felt like he was speeding and then he did one of these and he was unloading me from the car. "

Detroit police spokesman Sgt. Nicole Kirkwood said late Sunday night that the rear window of a police vehicle had been smashed. The department is investigating the actions of protesters and the driving officer.

The collision happened around 9:30 p.m. Werner on the highway west of Waterman Street. The marchers started the day with a rally at Patton Park. He marched Werner to Clark Park. They were heading back to Patton Park when the skirmish broke out.

The rally and parade brought together diverse groups of civil rights and other organizations that sought solidarity in the fight against systemic racism, police brutality, deportation, deportation, and water closure.

“This is an event organized by a coalition of different organizations,” said Tristan Taylor of Detroit, who led the march in Detroit. "It's us, we're working on what we said we were going to do as a company."

About 300 protesters started a rally in Patton Park, but the gang killed West Werner. Detroit police mostly watched from a distance.

More: Protesters raised 11 demands of the city before Tuesday's parade

MORE: 1 Detroit police officer suspended, 11 other incidents amid protests

A tense moment came just before 7 pm. Two protesters set up a Spanish-language billboard to hire people to join the Detroit police force. He covered it with hand-drawn sign readings: "There is no absolute ICE, no deaf police, no police in schools." They secured it with zip ties.

The crowd unraveled the sign and then surrounded two Detroit police officers as they pulled out of their vehicle to talk to the protesters. March shouted at Bullhorn: "Whose streets? Our streets. Whose city? Our city."

The officers stood for a minute before one of them started talking to the radio from his hips, and he pressed the radio to hear a scream against his ears. When officers returned to their vehicle to leave, the protesters danced and chanted, "My, my, my, my; ha, ha, good-bye."

Bass was one of the protesters who saw the authorities at the time. Later, he said a riot had occurred: "... the police were trying to figure out a way to control us."

Byes said the movement is bigger than the people on the street and can't control it.

"What you see is people taking control of us back and really reflecting our needs," he said. "I think the police haven't seen it in a while, so they don't know how to control it."

In addition to Detroit Will Breathe, the rally included representatives of ACCESS, BAMN, Queer Pride Detroit, and Detroit Hispanic Development Corporation. Immigrant rights groups, indigenous peoples' groups, and other activists marched from Patton Park to Werner Highway to Clark Park on Sunday evening.

There are also a few moments in the speeches before the parade at Patton Park.

Israel Darasih, 30, of Detroit, noted the historical tensions between Arab-American and some Arab-owned businesses and black communities. In the case of George Floyd, she mentioned how the Arab-owned business approached the police.

"How can we reduce this tension between Arab-owned convenience stores and predominantly black communities? How often do they operate?" He said \ v. "I don't have all the answers, but we should not get out of this difficult issue and this difficult conversation. And this is a ripe area for organizing the future and negotiating with Arab-led organizations, which are anti-racist."

Addressing the audience, the speakers emphasized the need to form coalitions.

Depressed communities need to work together, said Samantha Magdaleno, executive director of One Michigan for Immigrant Rights.

"Understand that these white systems are not for us. If we want justice, we must unite to get it," she said. "We will fight together. Not because we hate our oppressors, but because we love each other."

Detroit immigration rights manager Adonis Flores urged the audience to fight for change everywhere.

"We can fight politics. We can fight in the streets. We can fight at home, in our schools," he said. "Wherever you feel most comfortable ... we have to fight everywhere in every corner of our society.

Flores Queer Pride is with Detroit and Michigan United.

“When we fight together we get stronger,” he said. "In the current military police state, we are all subjected to the same type of oppression.

He urged the people to vote.

Jason Pasqua, the 27-year-old president of Oak Park, is with the Detroit Indigenous People. Blacks were neglected during the coronavirus pandemic, recalling the history of injustice and oppression.

"I'm here today to talk about black and brown solidarity," he said. "While America was founded on a universal appeal for equality and freedom, it was also founded on the suffering of enslaved Africans and extended by the indigenous people's carnage and land theft, also known as colonialism by colonists."

Pasqua says there are disparities in food and housing re-distribution, widespread deployment, and surveillance.

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