George Floyd: Minneapolis Council has vowed to repeal the police department



The majority of the Minneapolis City Council has promised to eliminate the local police department, an important step amid nationwide protests following the death of George Floyd last month.


Nine of the 13 councilors said they would build a "new paradigm of public safety" in a city that is legally accused of racism.

Mayor Jacob Frey initially opposed the move, drawing excitement from the crowd.

An anti-racist rally took place after Floyd's death in police custody.

However, security measures around the country were dismissed on Sunday as unrest began.


Mr. Floyd's funeral was scheduled for Tuesday before moving to his hometown of Houston, Minneapolis. The 46-year-old African American was pinned to the ground during protests that began after the video appeared, with a white police officer kneeling for nine minutes on her neck.

Officer Derek Chauvin was dismissed and charged with murder. Three other officers at the scene were also dismissed, charged with aiding and abusing them.

What did Minneapolis City Council members say?

Nine councilors read a statement to hundreds of protesters on Sunday.

City Council President Lisa Bender commented, "We are here because it is clear that our current policing and public safety system in Minneapolis and cities across America is not keeping our communities safe."

"Our efforts for incremental improvement have failed. Period."

Ms. Bender said the comprehensive plan needs to be discussed in detail, adding that she is trying to shift police funding toward community-based strategies.


Meanwhile, Councilor Alondra Cano tweeted that the city's "veto-proof majority" has agreed that the city's police department is "irreconcilable and we are going to end the current policing."




Peter Bose, BBC North America correspondent, said it would take several months to set up a community-led new organization.

The reform plan in Minneapolis also ensures that there is a long and complicated debate on new policing practices across America.

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