God has said that the ‘bulldozer’ of Africa runs on the Covid-19



Tanzanian Maverick President John Magufuli used his strong personality to corrupt civil servants for the cow and forced foreign mining companies to pay millions of dollars in unpaid taxes. The coronavirus may be less sensitive.


Last week, he was the first African leader to declare victory over the virus, despite not releasing health data for more than a month. He criticized the National Laboratory for increasing the number of infections, removing health professionals, and discouraging the use of masks. Sanctions such as weddings will be lifted from June 29 when schools will reopen.

But the optimism of the president is believed by reports of deaths and overnight burials by health officials wearing personal protective equipment. Dozens of Tanzanian truck drivers who had to be screened at border outposts tested positive. The US embassy warned last month that the risk of contracting the virus in the major city of Dar es Salaam was "very high" and that hospitals were high.

Hannington Amol, chief executive officer of the East African Law Society, told the Kenyan capital, Nairobi, "Tanzania's epidemic is causing panic and tension in the East African community." "The truth is, tombs in Tanzania are busy."

Neighbors are concerned. Kenya has closed the border for everyone except for cargo, Zambia has temporarily done so and Rwanda is holding out for trials before entry. In a June 4 interview with Uganda on the rise of cases in Tanzania, Splenza Muhenda Baguma, deputy chairman of the Health Parliamentary Committee, said the affairs were growing. Magufuli recently attended two summit meetings where he met with regional heads of state.

Scare you, Bravo
"President Magufuli decided not to shut the country down and to appease the crowd by allowing people to continue to scratch for survival," said Fathma Karoum, a former lawyer and former president of the Tanganyika Law Society. "It's a high-risk game."

Nicknamed “bulldozer” for his nonsense policy when he was minister of labor, Magufuli has been threatening and vandalizing his presidency since taking office in 2015. In his campaign to fight corruption, he often fired people when the cameras were rolling. - He received wide acclaim and extended his power in the party Chama Cha Mappinduji Party.

Criticizing the media and joking about the government means how Magufuli's outbreak is handled is largely limited to social media. Official information is limited and tightly regulated. At least 13 journalists, students, and politicians have been detained since March 23 for providing information about the virus, the Center for Legal and Human Rights in Tanzania said.

When the Ministry of Health stopped releasing statistics, there were 480 cases and 16 deaths in the country. This compares to about 4,000 cases, and as of Tuesday, there were more than 100 deaths in neighboring Kenya.

Tanzania's parliament passed a resolution last week praising Magufuli for "exemplary leadership" in combating the epidemic. CCM MLA's aide KC urged his fellow MPs to end the presidential cap and allow the 60-year-old to rule indefinitely.

'Divine Intervention'

Still, residents are not sure the authorities are in control of the disease.

"Although the government says we have very few cases, I think we still have many coronavirus infections," said Hamisi Tabata, a mechanic at Dar es Salaam. "That's why I'm still taking care of and drinking lemon and ginger every day to boost my immunity."

Government spokesman Hasan Abbasi said some hospitals in Dar es Salaam were empty. According to the text's message, "But we have a strong belief in divine intervention, so the church and the mosque are open."

Neighbors are concerned. Kenya has closed the border for everyone except for cargo, Zambia has temporarily done so and Rwanda is holding out for trials before entry. In a June 4 interview with Uganda on the rise of cases in Tanzania, Splenza Muhenda Baguma, deputy chairman of the Health Parliamentary Committee, said the affairs were growing. Magufuli recently attended two summit meetings where he met with regional heads of state.

Scare you, Bravo
"President Magufuli decided not to shut the country down and to appease the crowd by allowing people to continue to scratch for survival," said Fathma Karoum, a former lawyer and former president of the Tanganyika Law Society. "It's a high-risk game."

Nicknamed “bulldozer” for his nonsense policy when he was minister of labor, Magufuli has been threatening and vandalizing his presidency since taking office in 2015. In his campaign to fight corruption, he often fired people when the cameras were rolling. - He received wide acclaim and extended his power in the party Chama Cha Mappinduji Party.

Criticizing the media and joking about the government means how Magufuli's outbreak is handled is largely limited to social media. Official information is limited and tightly regulated. At least 13 journalists, students, and politicians have been detained since March 23 for providing information about the virus, the Center for Legal and Human Rights in Tanzania said.

When the Ministry of Health stopped releasing statistics, there were 480 cases and 16 deaths in the country. This compares to about 4,000 cases, and as of Tuesday, there were more than 100 deaths in neighboring Kenya.

Tanzania's parliament passed a resolution last week praising Magufuli for "exemplary leadership" in combating the epidemic. CCM MLA's aide KC urged his fellow MPs to end the presidential cap and allow the 60-year-old to rule indefinitely.

'Divine Intervention'
Still, residents are not sure the authorities are in control of the disease.

"Although the government says we have very few cases, I think we still have many coronavirus infections," said Hamisi Tabata, a mechanic at Dar es Salaam. "That's why I'm still taking care of and drinking lemon and ginger every day to boost my immunity."

Government spokesman Hasan Abbasi said some hospitals in Dar es Salaam were empty. According to the text's message, "But we have a strong belief in divine intervention, so the church and the mosque are open."

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