Russia denies the danger of a nuclear power plant after radiation

Russia has denied any of its power plants that there is a spike in radiation seen in the sky in northern Europe.    Scandinavian health officials found 'radionuclides' in the peninsula and the Arctic Circle last week. They are not entirely sure where they came from, but they say that they are certainly insidious and not part of natural phenomena.


Russia has denied any of its power plants that there is a spike in radiation seen in the sky in northern Europe.


Scandinavian health officials found 'radionuclides' in the peninsula and the Arctic Circle last week. They are not entirely sure where they came from, but they say that they are certainly insidious and not part of natural phenomena.

The Dutch National Institute for Public Health and Environment, "indicates that the formation of nucleoids causes damage to the fuel element in a nuclear power plant."

Although they cannot pinpoint the exact source, their analysis points to western Russia.

Lassina Zerbo, executive secretary of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Treaty Organization (CTBTO), tweeted a map showing potential radiation levels - but adding outside the mandate of the CTBTO. Identify the exact source ”.

The identified portion of the map includes parts of southern Sweden and Finland with nuclear reactors, but doubts arose over Russia, the Soviet Union at Chernobyl (now part of Ukraine) in 1986, the world's worst nuclear accident.

Rosenergoatom, a subsidiary of the Russian state nuclear agency Rosatom, said in a statement that the two reactors in the area had nothing wrong, both of which were built in the 1970s.

"There have been no complaints about the device's performance. The compilation of all the above isotopes does not exceed the emission reference numbers.

"Radiation levels have not changed in [plants] and surrounding areas since June. No changes have been observed.

The good news is that health officials in Scandinavia say that although radiation levels are abnormal, these levels are not harmful to human health.

In 2017, a radioactive cloud passed over Europe, and a study in 2019 concluded that it was from Russia.

In 1986, the Soviet Union did not initially tell the rest of the world about the disaster at Chernobyl, only to admit that something was wrong when radiation was discovered in Sweden. However, he said the situation was under control - it was not, and for a few more weeks, the reactor core was on fire.

The International Atomic Energy Agency said on Saturday it was aware of radiation and sought more information from affected countries.

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