Scientists discover a surprising structure wrapped around the Earth's core



Hot, dense matter droplets orbiting the Earth's center are wider than previous research.


A new method of analyzing seismic data is found more and more in previously known continent-sized regions at the boundary between the planet's core and the mantle.

We still don't know what these dots are - they may be magma, a leak from molten iron cores, or anything else - but with a more complete, detailed map of where they are, we're going to have a deeper understanding of the Earth's processes.

The main range is 2,900 kilometers (1,800 miles) above the Earth's surface. It's not available, so we need to be creative in order to know what the conditions below are. Fortunately, the Earth comes with a built-in tool for investigating its own morale: earthquakes.

Earthquakes and shocks spread through a variety of materials within the planet, allowing seismologists to design and reconstruct the interior of the Earth.



Similarly, a huge blob of super-hot material was discovered decades ago on the core-mantle border.

Because heat causes high levels of melting, these zones immediately slow down the seismic waves, so they are called ultra low-velocity zones.

But earthquakes can be an unsatisfactory device, providing only one stream of information at a time. You have to wait for earthquakes; Each earthquake examines only a narrow area and loses weak signals to widespread noise.

To compensate for this problem, researchers at the University of Maryland, Johns Hopkins University, and Tel Aviv University have become an exceptional resource: the stars.

Well, not really a star - an algorithm for studying stars. This is called sequencer and is designed to run through large astronomical datasets looking for patterns.


When this is over, this algorithm can also be adjusted to visualize seismic data. Lots of seismic data.

Researchers have called it 30 years of data - 7,000 seismograms of a particular type of seismic wave - in previous analyzes when we searched for seismic resonances that represent the missing low-velocity zone. And bingo, he's got a hit.

"We've got an entirely new approach by looking at the thousands of core-mantle boundary echoes, rather than focusing on something in general," says Dion Kim, a geologist at the University of Maryland.

"It shows us that there are a lot of structures in the core-mantle boundary area that can produce these resonances, and we don't realize this because we only have a narrow view."

Sequencer return results revealed subtle changes in seismic waves from earthquakes in Asia and Oceania, indicating an already ultra low-velocity region beneath Marquis Island in the South Pacific.

When this is over, this algorithm can also be adjusted to visualize seismic data. Lots of seismic data.

Researchers have called it 30 years of data - 7,000 seismograms of a particular type of seismic wave - in previous analyzes when we searched for seismic resonances that represent the missing low-velocity zone. And bingo, he's got a hit.

"We've got an entirely new approach by looking at the thousands of core-mantle boundary echoes, rather than focusing on something in general," says Dion Kim, a geologist at the University of Maryland.

"It shows us that there are a lot of structures in the core-mantle boundary area that can produce these resonances, and we don't realize this because we only have a narrow view."

Sequencer return results revealed subtle changes in seismic waves from earthquakes in Asia and Oceania, indicating an already ultra low-velocity region beneath Marquis Island in the South Pacific.

"We are surprised to see such a large feature beneath the island of Marquis," says Veteran Lessic, a geologist at the University of Maryland.

"This is really exciting because it shows that the sequencer algorithm helps to make seismogram data globally relevant in a way we could never do before."

In addition, the ultra low-speed zone is known below Hawaii. Produces more seismic resonances than expected. This suggests that it is much larger than predicted by previous studies.

All the research shows that the courage of the earth is worse than we suspected.

“We echo 40 percent of all seismic wave paths,” Leakey said.




"This is surprising, because we think they are very rare, and this means that the anomalous structures along the core-mantle boundary are much wider than previously thought."

After demonstrating the efficiency of sequencers in one type of waveform, the team's methods can now be applied to other types of waves and frequency. This helps to compile a new, high-resolution map of the Earth's interior.

This suggests that geologists can help predict the temperature of physical property, chemistry, and structure, bringing us to solve the mystery that surrounds the heart of the earth in this strange, dense area.

The research is published in Science.




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