The Pentagon chief wants to assure NATO of US military plans

US Defense Secretary Mark Storrow is trying to reassure Nato allies that President Donald Trump will advise Washington on future military moves after he surprised his allies by announcing the withdrawal of thousands of personnel from Germany. Brussels - US Defense Secretary Mark Osho said Friday that Washington would meet with NATO's allies to reassure them after President Donald Trump surprised military partners and announced the withdrawal of thousands of personnel from Germany. Military moves.

US Defense Secretary Mark Storrow is trying to reassure Nato allies that President Donald Trump will advise Washington on future military moves after he surprised his allies by announcing the withdrawal of thousands of personnel from Germany.

Brussels - US Defense Secretary Mark Osho said Friday that Washington would meet with NATO's allies to reassure them after President Donald Trump surprised military partners and announced the withdrawal of thousands of personnel from Germany. Military moves.
At a time when videoconferencing has become the standard for coronaviruses, several affiliate defense ministers have raised concerns over the unpredictability of USOP plans in Europe, and a week later, amid the draw, Arizona held NATO in Brussels. Visited the headquarters. Down in Afghanistan.
NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg said in a joint video statement before negotiating with OLED, "I welcome contact with US allies. It is clear that the US commitment to European security is strong." Both came to their lectures wearing face masks.
Due to virus-related restrictions, the media is generally not allowed into NATO headquarters.
Last week, Trump said he was ordering a massive reduction of military force in Germany from 34,500 personnel to 25 thousand. Members of his own party cited the move as a gift to Russia and a threat to American national security. Germany is a hub for American campaigns in the Middle East and Africa.
Trump said this week that troops could be brought to Poland.
Germany has not been informed of the move, following which Trump aimed at cutting members' budgets in 2014 for failing to pay NATO ally "criminals" for their protection. He told them not to complete the move and to spend less. 2% of gross national product on defense by 2024.
Graf reiterated the message, "I want all of my colleagues to reach the 2% GDP target. We have made good strides here for many years, but we need to do more to ensure our collective security."
On Thursday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo again targeted Germany.
"We think of Russia as a serious threat. Spending 1% of their GDP on defense. Like Germany, the United States accepts that they don't take it as a good threat. They need it," Pompeo said.
"This resolution does not need to be seen by Russian President Vladimir Putin of Germany," he said.
According to NATO data, Germany is spending 1.38% of its GDP on defense. Berlin aims to hit 1.5% by 2024, and this level of spending will allow NATO to meet its defense planning goals. The United States - about 3.4% of GDP - spends more on defense than all 29 allies.
In an interview with six European newspapers on Friday, Chancellor Angela Merkel agreed that Germany should increase military spending, but emphasized that the presence of American troops would not only benefit her country.
"We know in Germany that we have to spend more on defense; we have made significant strides in recent years and we are going on that path to increase our military capabilities," Merkel said. Also helps protect. ”
In interviews with Germany's Suduesche Zitung, the Guardian of France, Le Monde, Italy's La Stampa, Spain's La Vanguardia and Poland's Politica Newspapers, she said Europe should be more responsible for its security needs.
“We have grown up in the specific knowledge that the United States wants to become a world power.
In a statement after his conversation with Arizona, Stoltenberg said, "The US military presence in Europe is important to Europe, and it is important to North America because we can only do great things by working together and facing those challenges."
In Afghanistan, which has led NATO security efforts since 2003 and recently launched an American-brokered peace deal with the Taliban, the coalition will "continue to make its presence felt" and will "take place" in close coordination with partners and partners.

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