Trump said in an executive order seeking police reform, police need more money

Trump said in an executive order seeking police reform, police need more money

President Donald Trump signed an executive order aimed at identifying the misconduct of promoters of the law and creating incentives for departments to improve their practices.


The move comes in the form of lawyers on both sides of the law seeking to improve law enforcement in the wake of George Floyd's death in police custody.

The Trump administration's order rejected calls for "demeaning the police" to gain traction from the nationwide protest movement.

To suppress his fight against police vandalism and racism with protesters across the country, President Donald Trump on Tuesday signed an executive order that recognizes misconduct by law enforcement and offers incentives to departments.

"Local law enforcement is, in most cases, underfed and under [support]," Trump said.

Trump's move, which focused on the violence seen at some shows and aggressively demanded "peacekeepers" from state leaders, has called for lawmakers from both sides to step up in the wake of George Floyd's death in police custody.

Before signing the decree, Trump said in the Rose Garden, "Although we can all come from different places and from different backgrounds, we are united by our desire to ensure peace and dignity and equality or all Americans."

The President applauded law enforcement officials on the incident, saying: "There is very little we can do because they deserve so much. We deserve our gratitude and we must give them a lot of respect for what they do." Trump said he had held a meeting before the news conference with several families who died in a change with police.

The Trump administration's order rejected calls for "demeaning the police" to gain traction from a nationwide protest movement. Instead, the goal is to reward federal departments with money from police departments to update their standards on training and credit and create a database to track individual police on over-used complaints, such as metrics used by departments.

The ordinance encourages trained professionals such as social workers to work on certain nonviolent issues - including mental health, intoxication and homelessness - and not just the police.

"The aim is to bring the police to the communities," a senior administration official told the press on Monday evening. "We don't care about the police; we're looking to invest more and promote best practices."

Senior police officials said the administration has worked closely with several police associations, religious elders, and family organizations in drafting the order.

The president did not give a formal speech on activists' alleged protests of widespread police misconduct and structural racism. On social media, in the aftermath of Floyd's death on Memorial Day, he took an unbridled stance against boredom and exploitation, urging governors and mayors to call on the National Guard to prevent unrest.

An unarmed black man died in Minneapolis for more than eight minutes after a white officer stabbed him in the neck. Floyd is suspected of passing a fake $ 20 bill. The confrontation is captured in the video.

Trump's popularity has fallen, with his criticism of his performances and his criticism of the coronavirus pandemic. He faced reelection in November over Democratic presidential nominee Nominee Biden, who extended his edge over Trump in the recent national election.

Another black man in Atlanta - the deadly police shooting on Rashard Brooks Friday - "has a terrible situation," Trump said Monday.

Lawmakers from both parties are working to pass their own legislative resolutions to improve the police.

Democrats unveiled last week a comprehensive bill that would change the "qualified immunity" provisions for officials, making it easier for those who violate constitutional rights.

The elimination of qualified immunity is "non-starter," the White House said. A senior administration official told reporters Monday evening that I do not see the possibility of Congress ever approving it.

Republicans Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., one of the three black members of the Senate, led a working group to develop their own reform measures. Scott said on NBC's "Meet the Press" on Sunday that he believes both sides have a way to pass the bill into law.

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