Who killed the former Swedish Prime Minister Olof Palm?

Almost thirty years ago, Friday night, the Prime Minister of Sweden went to see a movie.


Olof Palm, in his second term as a public and outspoken speaker, nevertheless insisted that he lives like a common man and often left the security provided by the police. This is what they did.

He was going home with his wife, Lesbat, at midnight, and he died before being shot in the back.

His killer never caught on. However, he died on a busy road in Sweden and more than a dozen eyewitnesses shot a tall man before fleeing.

Now, 34 years later, the Sweden Prosecutor's Office has announced that it will present criminal investigation results at a press conference Wednesday morning.

"I believe I can now tell you who triggered this murder and who was responsible," Chief Prosecutor Chrysister Petersen told Swedish State Television in February.

He does not know what he will do after leaving the post. He does not know what he will do after leaving the post. Countless conspiracy theories have been placed and spread.

Dr. Jane Bandison, author of the book On Blood on the Snow: The Killing of Olof Palm, told the BBC: And then the killer disappeared and was never found. '

Olaf Palm's son Martin Palm said earlier this year that there was some evidence for police that they did not want to break up.

He thought it might be about a murder weapon that the evidence never found. He told a Swedish newspaper: "If anyone knows something important and it hasn't come yet, it's time to do it."

Who is Olof Palm?

Born into a wealthy family in 1927, Pam joined the Social Democratic Party in 1949 and took over the party leadership in 1969 after his mentor, Tag Ireland.

Anna Sandstrom, general secretary of the Olof Palm International Center, told the BBC: 'Palm is considered part of the Irish group. In a way, he was raised as a politician by Tag Ireland, known as the founder of the Swedish welfare system. I would say that they have adopted and advanced Ireland policies.



During his tenure, Pam expanded the powers of trade unions, expanded the nation's health care system, abolished all political power in the state, and invested heavily in education.

According to Ana Sundstrom, one of her reforms was the establishment of nurseries and preschools, which enabled women to work in Sweden for the first time and prioritize gender equality in the country.

He is a powerful voice in international affairs, criticizing both the United States and the Soviet Union. Pam publicly criticized the USSR invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968, and compared the American bombing of North Vietnam to the Nazi concentration camps in World War II in 1972, leading to the Washington-Stockholm relationship. Separated for a while.

In 1973, Olof Palm told the New York Times: "I'm sorry because you have to speak loudly to make your voice heard in this world."

He called the current racist system in South Africa a "terrible system," calling it the "cursed killer" of General Franco's government in Spain and campaigning against nuclear weapons. He also served as a mediator for the ceasefire between Iran and Iraq in the 1980s.

Many of his works in Sweden and abroad have produced supporters as well as enemies. While businessmen and liberals are furious over its reforms, leaders around the world are outraged at the criticism of other governments.


"It's like you love them or hate them," says Anna Sandstrom. There was intense anger. Nowadays, when we talk about the harsh rhetoric on politicians on social media, we’ve seen it all in Sweden under the direction of Olof Dem. They followed him very harshly.

“But the large Swedish population has given her a lot of love and respect,” she says. People still come to plant flowers in the area where he died.

How did Olof Pam die?
When Pam arrived home on the night of February 28, 1986, he had already removed his bodyguards and his wife suggested going to the cinema. Lisbeth spoke to her son Martin, who brought him a ticket for a comedy film for himself and his girlfriend.

Pam and his wife took the train to Cinema from Old Town and met their son and friend outside the Grand Cinema at nine o'clock at night.

After the film the two split up and Pam and his wife, Lisbeth, arrived on the busy Stockholm highway. At 23:21, a tall man followed by Pam and fired two shots into a corner of Soogan and Tunnelton. One bullet hit the PM's neck and the other at the waist.

The attacker went down the road and climbed a few stairs and disappeared.

Sweden was a shock. Charlotte Walston was only 12 at the time, but she woke up late at night.

He told the BBC: 'When we turned on the TV, there was news of his murder on a public street everywhere. The whole country is in shock.

Walston recalled that he lit candles in Pam's memory at his school meeting. "When he was killed, your political views did not matter. It was just a backlash. It never happened in Sweden.

The police were also seen as bleeding. Officers did not close the scene properly and the central area of ​​the city was closed within hours of the assassin's escape.

The Duornhites went to the place where the blood of the palm slept and lay on the ground. The witnesses left before being interrogated. A bullet was found by a passerby several days later.

Who killed Olaf Palm?
Despite a large number of witnesses, police have no clue.

Dr. Jane Bandison said: "The killer showed a powerful weapon, a 0.357 Magnum handgun. So the man who wanted to kill them committed the murder. This was not a chance. It was a well-planned event.

According to the first chief investigator in the case, the Kurdish terrorist PKK was involved in the murder. He was fighting against Turkey and at the time the Pulmira government declared it a "terrorist" group.

But he was forced to resign in 1987 after a raid on a bookstore used as a basis for the company.


In 1988, police arrested a convicted felon, Christer Peterson. Christer Patterson is accused of strangling a man on Stockholm Street in the 1970s for no apparent reason, and the night of Pam's murder is tantamount to that of an accused who appeared near the cinema.

After the film, the two split up and Pam and his wife, Lisbeth, arrived on the busy Stockholm highway. At 23:21, a tall man followed by Pam and fired two shots into a corner of Soogan and Tunnelton. One bullet hit the PM's neck and the other at the waist.

The attacker went down the road and climbed a few stairs and disappeared.

Sweden was a shock. Charlotte Walston was only 12 at the time, but she woke up late at night.

He told the BBC: 'When we turned on the TV, there was news of his murder on a public street everywhere. The whole country is in shock.

Walston recalled that he lit candles in Pam's memory at his school meeting. "When he was killed, your political views did not matter. It was just a backlash. It never happened in Sweden.

The police were also seen as bleeding. Officers did not close the scene properly and the central area of ​​the city was closed within hours of the assassin's escape.

The Duornhites went to the place where the blood of the palm slept and lay on the ground. The witnesses left before being interrogated. A bullet was found by a passerby several days later.

Who killed Olaf Palm?
Despite a large number of witnesses, police have no clue.

Dr. Jane Bandison said: "The killer showed a powerful weapon, a 0.357 Magnum handgun. So the man who wanted to kill them committed the murder. This was not a chance. It was a well-planned event.

According to the first chief investigator in the case, the Kurdish terrorist PKK was involved in the murder. He was fighting against Turkey and at the time the Pulmira government declared it a "terrorist" group.

But he was forced to resign in 1987 after a raid on a bookstore used as a basis for the company.

In 1988, police arrested a convicted felon, Christer Peterson. Christer Patterson is accused of strangling a man on Stockholm Street in the 1970s for no apparent reason, and the night of Pam's murder is tantamount to that of an accused who appeared near the cinema.

During a police investigation, Lisbeth was convicted in 1989 of identifying Pam Peterson as a murderer, but Peterson's lawyer immediately filed an appeal. With intent to commit murder and without a murder weapon, the court released him three months later and paid ڈ 50,000 as compensation. Patterson died in 2004.

Sweden's mass shock and obsession over the murder have led to dozens of beliefs, also known as 'Pulm Disease'.

A former South African police officer stated in 1996 that Pam was killed for speaking out against racism. Swedish investigators went there the same year, but could not gather any evidence to support this claim, although some felt that the previous government should still be considered an accused.

Until her death in 2004, Stag Larson, author of the book Girl of the Dragon Tattoo, researched the murder and followed the same ideology.

At the same time, Dr. Bandison believes the murder was linked to an arms deal with India. Swedish arms company Bofors agreed to supply artillery to India from 1980 to 1990, but it was later reported that the company had recommended "intermediaries" in India for the deal. The Prime Minister of India is Rajiv Gandhi.

Dr. Bondison says that the Bofors organization may have been known to be corrupt on the day Pam's murder. So there is a strong reason to kill Pam, the middle man behind the deal. But this is something that the police have always ignored.

Another possible character is Stag Engstrom, who worked at Scandia Insurance Company near the scene and was one of the 20 murder witnesses. He committed suicide in 2000.

Police have launched an investigation into Angstrom in 2018. Thomas Pietersen, a Swedish journalist accused of training for weapons and befriending a man with a variety of firearms, was found guilty of a 12-year study by Engstrom.

He lied about the scene, saying he had even tried to sue the Prime Minister.

"Most Swedes thought Engstrom was a scapegoat," the doctor said. But he was a modest man, the killer was tall and powerful, and Engstrom had never killed anyone before.

Dr. Bondison does not believe that anything more is going on. "I think it's contrary to expectations, but we'll see."

"I don't expect anything, I don't expect an explanation, but I think it's important to close the case," Sandstrom said. If you have no answer, you should turn it off.



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