Australian police patrolling Melbourne's lock-down virus hotspot

 Australian police on Thursday set up suburban podcasts at Melbourne's Coronavirus Hotspot and are considering implementing stay-at-home orders for using drones.    More than 1,000 police posts were set up in about 36 suburbs, returning to lockdown after new infections emerged.    While the rest of Australia has opened its state borders and eased social discrimination restrictions, Victoria State of Melbourne has promised penalties for those in the affected areas who are preventing unnecessary movement.


Australian police on Thursday set up suburban podcasts at Melbourne's Coronavirus Hotspot and are considering implementing stay-at-home orders for using drones.


More than 1,000 police posts were set up in about 36 suburbs, returning to lockdown after new infections emerged.

While the rest of Australia has opened its state borders and eased social discrimination restrictions, Victoria State of Melbourne has promised penalties for those in the affected areas who are preventing unnecessary movement.

Victoria reported 77 new cases, up slightly from the previous day, and corresponding to an increase of more than double the daily rate.

The state government has launched an investigation into the implementation of the hotel blockade, which has led to some new infections for people returning from abroad, which necessitated a two-week separation.

"I'm obviously concerned about the outbreak, and I'm glad the Prime Minister has replaced the lockdown to spread to the suburbs," Prime Minister Scott Morrison said at a televised news conference referring to the Victorian. Government.

"We've seen it on some levels (in new cases), though they are high and it's a matter of concern and now that the lockdown is in place, we hope to see those numbers again."

Victoria Police Commissioner Shane Patton has promised to be heavy on "over-sized public spaces" and use drones to track people traveling for other reasons, such as police work, school, health care, and grocery shopping.

"People don't know where we are. They don't know how long we will be, but they will stop."

Australia has surpassed 8,000 cases and 104 deaths compared to many countries in the epidemic. However, a recent jump in Victoria has prevented fears of a second wave of COVID-19, concerns in other countries.

Most states have stated that they will reopen their internal borders except Victoria. Neighboring New South Wales (NSW), the most populous state, has opened its borders excluding those from the Victorian suburbs.

The director of Fat Milk Cafe in Travancore, Melbourne, one of the affected suburbs, said the sudden return to the lockdown caused the kitchen to overflowing.

"What do you do with that stock? You have to close it because the kitchen is takeaway," the director said, giving only his first name, Hatch.

"At four to five employees, you only have one employee. It's tough, but you have to find the hobby, drive it, be a little creative, and stay there."

Weak link

The Victorian outbreak raised concerns about the effectiveness of state detention policies.

In neighboring New South Wales, supermarket chain Woolworths Group has sacked 50 employees at a Sydney store after an employee tested the virus despite two weeks of the forced cleanup in Victoria, authorities said.

Meanwhile, in the two months, since a passenger entered the country over Melbourne, the far north region reported the first infection and showed symptoms after returning to its home region when completed.

"People may be anxious to hear this news, but these measures are in place to protect our community (and)," Northern Territory Health Minister Natasha Files told reporters.

The 30-year-old who was infected said they were alone in the hospital.

Globally, coronavirus cases exceeded 10 million on Sunday, a major milestone in the spread of a disease that has killed more than half a million people in seven months.


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