Boris Johnson cautioned against integration in an Israeli newspaper article


International pressure is mounting on Israel as Netanyahu loses its self-serving goals


Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu recalled his own target date for the destruction of occupied Palestinian territories, France warned of "consequences" and Boris Johnson appealed for the move in an article in the Hebrew media from Israel. Re-inspection should be done.

Johnson, who described himself as an "ardent defender of Israel," said any attachment would be "a violation of international law" and would not change Britain's pre-1967 confinement with the West Bank. Israelis and Palestinians disagree.

Israeli cabinet minister and Netanyahu's confidant, Inner Akunis, confirmed on Wednesday that the process would not begin, with Israel's Army Radio telling Israeli Army Radio officials that they are still preparing final details with their US counterparts. However, he stressed that he still expected the integration to take place in July.

Acunis said he could not overturn coordination with the Trump administration. In January, the US pushed for a third of the West Bank to directly control Israel and left the Palestinians with limited autonomy in the remaining land pockets.

According to sources familiar with the Trump administration and Israel's conversation quoted in the Jerusalem Post, a decision on the schedule and scope could be made next week.

However, despite the deadline, international pressure mounts on Israel, with French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian telling the parliamentary committee that "a decision cannot be made without consequences."

Amid growing debate in the European capitals about retaliation, Leprien said that if Israel were to take over any of the occupied territories, "we are considering different options at the national level and our main European is also coordinating with partners."

The United Nations, the European Union and the major Arab states have all issued similar messages, claiming that the annexe violates international law and reduces the already low chances of establishing a viable independent Palestinian state with Israel.

Johnson emphasized his warm feelings toward Israel, referring to the time he worked on the kibbutz at age 18 in his article for the daily Yedioth Aharonoth, and discussing the following:

Notably, Johnson translated his intervention into Hebrew, the nation's most widely read publication, Yedioth Aharonoth, rather than Herz or the Jerusalem Post.

He said in parliament last month that he "fears that these proposals will fail in his goal of securing Israel's borders and is contrary to Israel's own long-term interests" and "represents a violation of international law." Echoes of comment made.

Johnson writes, "Israel's progress in improving relations with the Arab and Muslim worlds puts it in crisis," calling for a solution that would allow justice and security for both Israel and Palestine. Give.

“I sincerely hope that the attachment will not continue.

Johnson's remarks, which appear to be one of the most personally friendly European leaders towards Israel, are a reminder of the diplomatic risks.

According to Trump's announced plan, Israel is expected to extend its sovereignty to Jewish settlements in the Western Bank and the Jordan Valley. However, key figures in the Trump administration - the president's son-in-law, Jared Kushner - have been chilling over Israel's unilateral actions.

According to Trump's announced plan, Israel is expected to extend its sovereignty to Jewish settlements in the Western Bank and the Jordan Valley. However, key figures in the Trump administration - the president's son-in-law, Jared Kushner - have been chilling over Israel's unilateral actions.

If there is no "declaration" on this issue on behalf of Donald Trump, Akunis believes there will be no comment on Israel's Army radio. According to an unconfirmed report on the Israeli television channel, the Trump administration is signing a deal with Israel for a regional gesture toward the Palestinians before continuing.

Palestinians, who have rejected the Trump proposal, want to establish East Jerusalem as their capital, the state in the West Bank, and the Gaza Strip. Israel captured those areas in the 1967 war and in 2005 withdrew troops and settlers from Gaza.

Netanyahu met with US ambassadors Tuesday to discuss the framework of Trump's Middle East peace plan and later said such talks would continue for several days. A US official has told Reuters that Trump is having "very strong talks" with Israel over the plan.

The Trump proposal puts more than 30% of the West Bank sovereignty over Israel - Israel has been building settlements for decades - as well as setting up a Palestinian state under harsh conditions. Palestinians say the plan is losing its viability.

While Netanyahu insisted on working with U.S. negotiators since the Trump administration, they were left alone in their own cabinets and proposals internationally, ahead of schedule.

Netanyahu and his senior coalition partner, Benny Gantz, arrived on time for an arbitrary attachment move. The plan attracted opposition from some settlers and pro-settler politicians, who were concerned that the takeover would lead to the creation of a Palestinian state, which they opposed.

Johnson's intervention, echoing the long-standing British position, is spectacular because the Palestinians regard him as unstable for his cause. During a field trip in 2015, he was canceled at a Palestinian Youth Forum conference after he dismissed supporters of deportations, sects, and sanctions (BDS) as "leftist academics" wearing corduroy jackets.

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