The World Health Organization says the coronavirus vaccine is not expected before Christmas

An expert from the World Health Organization hopes that the coronavirus vaccine will not be "realistically" available before Christmas, even before it


An expert from the World Health Organization hopes that the coronavirus vaccine will not be "realistically" available before Christmas, even before it is available.


Mike Ryan, the WHO's head of emergency programs, said vaccine development could be curtailed as much as possible, but "could not reduce corners on security".

This comes after the head of the UK Vaccine Task Force stated that there was a possibility of making a coronavirus vaccine during Christmas.

Many vaccines are now in the third stage and so far none have failed, Drs. "We are seeing signs of hope," Ryan admitted.

“But I think we need to be realistic on two things,” Dr. Ryan warned.

"One, we need to be realistic on time. No matter how hard we try, we need to make sure these vaccines are safe and effective and that it takes time, and we will do it as fast as we can.

"But we do not intend to cut corners on security in any way."

He confirmed: "Actually it will be the first part of next year before we get vaccinated."

Dr. Ryan warned that vaccines are not 100 percent effective and called on people to "be realistic in our expectations."

"It remains to be seen how effective this vaccine will be and how long the protection will last," he said.

“We’re going to be vaccinated in two or three months, and then suddenly this virus disappears - I’d like to say.

"But it's not realistic and it's important that we be realistic in our expectations."

Dr Ryan spoke with Dr Maria van Kerkhov on Wednesday, urging people to "do what we can now", including washing hands, wearing social masks, and wearing face masks.

"We need to apply the best vaccines and get the best treatment, but we have to be realistic and do what we can now," he said.

"There is a lot we can do right now, and if we have already suppressed it, vaccination will make it much easier to get rid of this virus."

The news comes after scientists at Oxford University discovered that the coronavirus vaccine "is safe and stimulates the immune response."

A team of experts, led by Professor Sarah Gilbert, will complete them in the fall to conduct more extensive community trials in the UK and abroad.

Dr. Ryan thanked the volunteers who came forward to take part in the vaccine tests.

"Real-world tests are very different and we really thank those who volunteered for the studies."

"They're doing very important studies and people go ahead and say 'yes, I want to be a part of this study.'

"This is a great contribution to the whole world. It is a great gift to humanity."

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