The United States has accused Chinese and Malaysian hackers of carrying out global operations


U.S. officials say they stole identity and video game technology, paid ransom and spied on Hong Kong workers. Two Malaysians have been arrested’ but five Chinese remain.

The United States has accused Chinese and Malaysian hackers of carrying out global operations


The U.S. Department of Justice on Wednesday indicted five Chinese nationals and two Malaysians for global hacking in at least six years.

The hackers targeted more than 100 companies and individuals in the United States and around the world, including software development, video game and social media companies, officials said. He allegedly spied on pro-democracy politicians and activists in Hong Kong and gained access to official computer systems in India and Vietnam.

The allegations are part of the Trump administration's wider efforts to ban cybercrime by China amid tensions between the two countries.

Who are the hackers?

The seven were long known’ by cyber security experts as the "APT 41" hacking organization, identified by their combined tools and techniques.

Three of the Chinese suspects operate from Chengdu 404, a Sichuan-based company that intends to offer network security services to other businesses.

Although the allegations did not indicate a direct political motive behind the hackers' activities, a plaintiff, a member of Chengdu 404, Jiang Lizhi, allegedly established ties with the Chinese Ministry of State Security.

Acting U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia, Michael Sherwin, said a hacker for profit is not hacking a pro-democracy group.

The five Chinese suspects are on the run, but prosecutors say two Malaysians were arrested’ in Malaysia this week and are facing extradition to the United States.


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